San Francisco 49ers to Use 85% Recycled Water in their Levi’s Stadium Home

Recycled water will account for roughly 85 percent of all water used in Levi’s Stadium — the new home of the San Francisco 49ers — and will be used for irrigation of the field as well as a 27,000-square-foot green roof, flushing toilets and cooling tower make-up water. Inside, the stadium is dual plumbed with recycled water used for flushing toilets. Following final testing by the City of Santa Clara Water and Sewer Utilities, Levi’s Stadium recently was connected to the city’s recycled water system, making it the first stadium in California to utilize the drought-proof water source. The milestone brings the facility one step closer to a Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification. Though other stadiums in the U.S. are plumbed for recycled water use, none are using it to the extent and in the myriad ways as is Levi’s Stadium. “Utilizing recycled water in so many different spaces and in such a variety of ways was a challenging proposition,” said Chris de Groot, the City’s Director of Water and Sewer Utilities. “We had to develop a new way to test both potable and recycled systems for a building of this size, and get approval from the California Department of Public Health. Through innovation and cooperative partnerships, we were able to achieve this new standard.” The recycled water system will be a key element in helping to make Levi’s Stadium one of the most sustainable stadiums in the country and the first NFL stadium to open with a LEED Gold rating from the US Green Building Council. Other sustainable features include energy efficient systems, solar...
Worthy Farm Says It’s Bye Bye Time To The Stinky Portable Loo

Worthy Farm Says It’s Bye Bye Time To The Stinky Portable Loo

It’s a much a part of the Glastonbury experience as secret gigs, cider buses, mud baths and magical sunsets at the Stone Circle, but this year the horrible stench of portable plastic loos has been banished from Worthy Farm. They may have been too busy basking in the sunshine, then putting on their wellies as the rain arrived on Thursday afternoon, but the thousands of festival-goers who have been arriving at the Somerset site since Wednesday will have struggled to spot a bright blue portable toilet anywhere on the 12,000 acre site. Instead a new combination of eco-friendly “long-drop” toilets and composting loos means that only 150 of the 5,000 lavatory seats at Glastonbury Festival sit above a chemical stink. “We’ve used portable plastic toilets for more than 20 years, but frankly they are not up to the job,” said Jane Healy, the festival’s sanitation manager. “They don’t work in our particular high-intensity environment, partly because the experience is so unpleasant that many people don’t want to touch the plastic, so they don’t flush. This year though festival organisers have invested in 312 large toilet blocks, with thousands of new toilets. These new lavatories, called “long-drops”, store waste from the festival’s 200,000 ticket holders and staff in underground tanks before it is turned into manure and spread on the fields of Worthy Farm and the surrounding area. The real battle against “festival faecal phobia” at Glastonbury is being waged by Hamish Skermer, though. He’s an Australian environmental scientist, who is firmly at the top of the eco-toilet heap at the festival. And this year his firm Natural Events has...

Water Savings Meredith Music Festival

Meredith Music Festival and Golden Plains are two annual events held on the same site in rural, in semi-cleared bushland, 90km West of Melbourne, in Victoria, Australia in December and March. The venue is a spectacular, permanent site, set up specifically for both events, owned and managed by the festival producers. It has been purpose-built and continually-refined using 18 years of collective know-how to provide a premium experience for performer and patron alike. The festivals both run over two days, with most patrons camping. Meredith has an audience of 10 000 and Golden Plains 8 000. There are many sustainable initiatives at the festivals such as onsite composting of waste, energy efficient lighting and retrofitting underway, and onsite solar powered kitchen with rain water capture for staff. The focus of this case study however is: Permanent composting toilets Harvested water sustainable shower blocks The Problem Toilets and showers have long been the bane of the festivalgoer’s generally happy existence. In order to address this and the many operational issues associated with water-based toilets and showers, Meredith management decided to build their own onsite permanent infrastructure that is far superior to standard hire-in options. This has worked to improve the comfort and overall experience for festival-goers and makes the festival itself easier, cheaper (in the long run) and more enjoyable to operate for management and staff. Also of consideration is the fact that the Meredith site is in an agricultural and farming area of regional/rural Victoria that gets very little rain. The region, like many others in Victoria, is feeling the effects of the ongoing drought and is on stage...

Festival Showers

Falls Festival treats 100% of the 250 000 litres of wastewater created onsite through the forty onsite showers and wastewater points through a soak-away trenches. Soak-away drainage trenches are located at each of the shower blocks with 50% of water treated by soakage. Any excess that cannot be handled by the localised soak-aways is placed in a large centralized soak-away trench. If it’s particularly dry and there isn’t much moisture content in the earth, the soak-away system works significantly quicker. At the end of the event there is usually about 100 000 litres left to treat which is done managed throughout the year through the soak-away trenches....

Waterless Urinal

www.uritonnoir.com French company Faltazi has invented L’Uritonnoir, an ingenious idea which uses specially shaped funnels inserted into the side of straw bales as waterless urinals for outdoor events. The remaining product – urine (nitrogen) and straw (carbon) can be composted in six to twelve months. A single Uritonnoir looks like a wide funnel with a tapered spike on the end and is either pre-made from stainless steel or folded together from a flat polypropylene sheet. A bale of straw is used as the stand. The spike on the end is inserted into the straw and then secured with a strap that wraps around the entire bale. Depending on the size of the bale, you can add as many Uritonnoirs as you need. The size and number of bales of straw is dependent on the number of patrons and the length of the event. The bales should be sited upon gravel pits which have been dug to 20cm, to ensure no seepage occurs. The width of the straw bales also acts as an odour inhibitor. While the idea seems it could be easily replicable, you’re highly recommended to use this company’s expertise and experience, as they’ve done the research to ensure this human waste stream is handled hygienically and safely....

What’s Your Water Source?

In 2013, Global Inheritance partnered with Coachella Music & Arts Festival to present the ‘Oasis Water Bar’. This initiative focuses on bringing awareness to the complexities and challenges we face regarding the future of drinking water. Festival-goers can learn about where their drinking water comes from today, what they might be drinking five years from now and even what they may be drinking 20 or 30 years in the future. The Oasis features bartenders/scientists who are experts in water conservation and innovation who interact with water bar patrons, providing information and a better understanding on their own water consumption. Everyone visiting The Oasis is offered up to 3 different shots of water to sample while learning the backstory of each source. Every Oasis water type is individually custom-bottled/labelled and displayed behind the bar to promote the programme and water sources. Over 14 different water sources are highlighted at The Oasis including Purified Wastewater, Desalinated Pacific Ocean Water, Los Angeles Tap Water, Glacier Water, Rainwater, Hot Spring Water, and several more....

Water on Wheels

Water on Wheels, also known as ‘WOW’, is a mobile water service based in Canada. Founded in 2010, WOW is committed to minimising the use of commercially-bottled water at events by providing mobile water refill stations in key locations. WOW refill stations are utilised by festivals, corporate and athletic events, street shows and other public events to offer chilled and filtered water at no cost to event-goers. WOW refill stations each feature four faucets and are connected to existing water sources, such as fire hydrants, to ensure that water never runs out. Refill stations require no electricity to run, and enable event organisers to radically decrease or even eliminate the use of commercially-bottled water at their events. WOW also maintains a list of ‘Blue Communities’ – communities that have banned the use of commercially packaged bottled water, on which more than forty Canadian municipalities are listed. WOW provides an environmentally-friendly alternative to commercially-bottled water, and a large event serviced by WOW can save up to 25 000 bottles of commercially-packaged water....