NASCAR’s Sustainability

NASCAR has launched a sustainability program simply named, NASCAR Green . It has been in existence for five years now and aims to reduce the environmental impact of the sport. Part of the success of NASCAR Green stems from the many initiatives they have started and kept through the years. NASCAR now has the largest recycling and environmental sustainability programs among all sports in the United States. More details on some of the initiatives NASCAR Green has implemented over the years… NASCAR Implemented what is considered to be the largest recycling program anywhere in US sports and is made possible with the help of big names like Coca-Cola Recycling, Coors Light, Safety-Kleen and Creative Recycling. Thousands of fans are encouraged to put aluminum cans and plastic bottles in the proper bins located around the race track. Coca-Cola Recycling processes 1,000 containers per minute using their portable processing center. Safety-Kleen recycles and re-refines around 200,000 gallons of race-used oil for over 200 NASCAR races a year. These numbers speak for themselves. Other successful endeavors include recycling tires used on NASCAR cars and trucks from the top three national race series. Goodyear brings around 121,000 tires annually to North Carolina to receive first-phase processing. During a Sprint Cup event, fans can get a pre-addressed postage-paid envelope into which they can put their used or non-working cellular phones, batteries and accessories. These can be from any carrier, network or brand. Since this initiative started in 2001, Sprint has recycled over 24 million phones. Now to capture 100% of the greenhouse gasses (GHG) emitted during a race (on-track), the NASCAR Green Clean Air...

Manchester International Festival’s Sustainable Highlight

Manchester International Festival (MIF) is the world’s first festival of original, new work and special events and takes place biennially in Manchester, UK. The Festival launched in 2007 as an artist-led, commissioning festival presenting new works from across the spectrum of performing arts, visual arts and popular culture. MIF prides itself on having made a significant commitment to reducing the environmental impacts of its office operations and was the first festival to be independently certified as meeting the sustainable events standard, BS8901, as well as a recipient of A Greener Festival award. Whilst the ethos of being artist-led is central to their mission, benefitting the local economy, engaging local communities and minimizing its environmental impact are also stated core principles. Examples of activities have included: greening the office space; sourcing and creating productions responsibly and working with partner venues to reduce the environmental impact of MIF events. The team realized that it was very difficult to monitor and reduce the carbon footprint of a festival, given the varied spaces into which it reaches: “We calculate the carbon for the office we don’t do the festival because, who has the capacity to calculate carbon for an entire festival?” (ibid) One space over which MIF does have control is Festival Square. In 2011, actions included using compostable cutlery and tableware and expanding recycling facilities which saved 79% of festival waste from landfill. Partnerships with the City Council were developed to secure electricity supply without the use of external generators, bikes were used to help staff get around, production sets were re-used and recycled and banners upcycled into usable bags. The priorities...

Best Tips To Become A Food-Waste Fighting Event Superhero

As a major buyer of catering service, event professionals have a significant opportunity to reduce food waste and save money. Global food waste is a major problem. In the two minutes it takes to scan this article: • 15,210 tonnes of food will be produced • 10,267 tonnes of food will be consumed • 4,943 tonnes of food will be wasted That’s enough to out-weigh 2,700 SUVs. In fact, losses incurred by food producers from this waste will exceed of $2.8 million USD globally by the time you reach the last line in this post. (Source: World Food Clock) Fortunately, event professions have numerous opportunities to reduce food waste: Will You Be Dining? – Predicting food and beverage quantities is tough. While historic records can help if you have them, so can asking attendees if they plan to attend certain meals when they register. Portion Control, People! – Before ordering blindly, check with your caterer about serving size, and make sure it makes sense for your group. One conference planner I knew who did this was able to reduce her food budget by $150,000! For small parties check out the Party Food Portions tool by Love Food, Hate Waste. Be flexible and Listen to Chef’s Choices – If you permit them some discretion to respond to the prevailing growing season, Chefs can often leverage relationships with local producers to take advantage of produce that is in season and high supply, providing the freshest options, often at better prices. Use Local and Seasonal Produce Finders – Look to online produce guides and share them with your Chef (Local Harvest (North...

Stadium Converts 2,800 Pounds Food Waste Into A Worthy Cause

AT&T Stadium, along with the EPA, the city of Dallas, nonprofit Rock and Wrap It Up! and Food Source DFW diverted 2,800 pounds of leftover food from landfills during the NCAA Final Four activities in North Texas. The organizations prevented food waste by delivering the food to local homeless shelters. Diverting food waste from landfills also reduces the generation of harmful greenhouse gas emissions. When food is disposed of in a landfill, it decomposes rapidly and becomes a significant source of methane. After paper, food waste comprises the greatest volume of waste going into US landfills, the EPA says. In 2012, 36 million tons of food waste were generated, but only 3 percent of this waste stream was diverted from landfills. The EPA’s Food Recovery Challenge seeks to reduce the environmental impact of food and other widely-used everyday items through their entire life cycle, including how they are extracted, manufactured, distributed, used, reused, recycled and disposed. Last week nine additional colleges joined the Food Recovery Challenge, whose some 713 participants including Whole Foods, MGM Resorts and the Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team. This post was produced from this story :...

Music To Our Ears: Striving For Energy Efficiency Even In Outdoor Festivals

A growing number of music festivals, specially that it’s summertime now, take strides in favor of sustainability and energy efficiency. Below are successful methods on how to accomplish this worthy endeavor Festival season is in full swing as thousands of fans gather to watch their favorite artists perform live in one place for these multi-day shows. But these events often get a bad rap for leaving behind large carbon footprints and massive amounts of waste. Transportation: The impact of thousands of vehicles being driven to the venue is an energy-wasting nightmare. To reduce the carbon footprints and inconveniences of driving, festival coordinators have started to encourage attendees to use public transportation or carpool to its venues. Last month’s sweetlife festival in Columbia, Maryland partnered with Rock & Bus and Uber to offer a roundtrip party bus experience that lessened the number of vehicles on the road. Festivals have also created incentive systems that reward attendees for taking alternative forms of transportation such as riding their bicycles. At Chicago’s Lollapalooza, sustainable commuters receive free apparel and are entered into raffles for their efforts. Energy-Friendly Changes Effective energy savings methods were used such as the following – The Bumbershoot Festival in Seattle uses carbon-neutral energy supplied from Seattle City Light and added solar panels to light the rooms that house artwork at the festival. Similarly, the sweetlife festival has partnered with Opower in the past to calculate the event’s carbon footprint, purchased renewable energy certificates, and installed solar panels on the main stages to offset power usage. The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival featured an Energy Playground where festivalgoers charged...

Highlights Of The 2014 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival

Thousands of festival attendees helped keep Empire Polo Grounds clean while rescuing bottle and cans from the clutches of landfill. Those who participated were rewarded for their efforts with Coachella Polar Bear tees, VIP upgrades, refillable water bottles, Coachella posters, food vouchers + more. A huge thank you to all the amazing people who helped bring the sustainability programs to life this year at Coachella. Your hard work, dedication and intelligence helped make this year one of the best ever. None of this is possible without you. Special thanks to the lovely people at Coachella / Goldenvoice, all our amazing volunteers, interns and staff members, the incredible artists who redesigned recycling bins, Eyerus for their legendary design skills, GreenTow for donating the solar power, all the festival attendees who participated and everyone else who played a part, big or small, in making the programs a success. TRASHed : Art Of Recycling Gallery Celebrating 10 years of getting TRASHed with Coachella, 50+ artists redesigned recycling bins that were integrated throughout the festival grounds. As part of the TRASHed tradition, these magnificent beauties will be donated to schools throughout Southern California. Polar Bears, Recyclosaurus Rex, & Energy Seesaw Gallery In support of the Saving Nature World Tour, the Polar Bears roamed the Empire Polo Ground promoting acts of kindness toward the earth. While their BFF, Recyclosaurus Rex, ruled the camping area, the Bears inspired the young, the old and the famous to save nature. The Saving Nature Arcade Gallery The Saving Nature Arcade opened its doors for the very first time at Coachella Valley. Arcade classics were re-skinned to spotlight key...

Festival Organisers Encouraged To Lessen Campsite Waste

Buckinghamshire New University is working with Love Your Tent to lobby festival organisers and retailers over wasteland culture at festivals. Waste campaign group Love Your Tent is also asking festival organisers to sign up to a 10% reduction agreement in campsite waste year-on-year. The campaign follows the University’s recent study of 1200 respondents on their festival habits. The survey found that 60% of respondents who camped would admit to previously discarding tents after a festival, with 35% not planning to change their behaviour any time soon. Juliet Ross-Kelly, founder of Love Your Tent and a director of Eco Action Partnership Ltd, said, “Thanks to the great support and work by Bucks we can see how much work still needs to be done to encourage a change in audience behaviour. “By targeting festivals to reduce their campsite waste by 10% year on year we are leading a change that will help to protect festival culture for future generations and from the work that we’ve done with the Isle of Wight Festival, we know it’s achievable.” More positively, 86% of those surveyed acknowledged that waste has an impact on the environment at festivals. Latest figures show that campsite waste contributes to 86% of total music festival waste, and 71% of the waste causes lasting land damage to sites. The international study showed that cheap tents are one cause of the increasing problem. 46% of respondents paid less than £75, and nearly two thirds (60%) left their tent because it was broken. Teresa Moore, a leading sustainable event management/festival expert and head of department, Music and Events Management at Bucks New University,...

2014 Waste Management Phoenix Open Nominated for ‘Sports Event of the Year’

Title sponsor Waste Management successfully diverted all tournament waste from landfills and achieved the “Zero Waste Challenge”, with 100% of waste sent to recycling, composting and waste-to-energy facilities. The Waste Management Phoenix Open was nominated for the ‘2014 Sports Event of the Year’ award by the Sports Business Journal and Sports Business Daily at the seventh annual Sports Business Awards last night in New York City. The Sports Event of the Year award was won by the 2014 Bridgestone Winter Classic and was one of 15 awards handed out at the prestigious event held at the New York Marriott Marquis at Times Square. “We’re honored to have been nominated for this outstanding award,” said 2014 Waste Management Phoenix Open Tournament Chairman, Tom King. “And while we didn’t win the award, the nomination and national exposure for our event is incredible. The 2014 Waste Management Phoenix Open was a record setting event on many fronts, including: Title sponsor Waste Management successfully diverted all tournament waste from landfills. This ambitious goal and challenge took months of planning and a zero-waste playbook that put everyone from vendors to volunteers on the same page. In the end, the “Zero Waste Challenge” was attained, with 100% of waste sent to recycling, composting and waste-to-energy facilities. The Waste Management Phoenix Open and host Thunderbirds have raised more than $86 million for local charities in the tournament’s 79 year history, with more than $60 million generated since 2004. Attendance of 563,008 for the week (a new overall tournament and PGA TOUR attendance record), TPC Scottsdale was Arizona’s 2nd most populated “city” and more than 40,000 people...

Sustainable America And Grind2Energy Big Campaign To Promote Composting!

Many organizers of large events want to do the right thing – to achieve a “zero waste” event, but these same organizers find it very difficult to achieve. Part of the problem is that there is a lot of compostable paper waste and utensils that don’t break down easily in traditional composting facilities. Warmer weather is a sign of lots of great summer things to come, including one of our favorites: outdoor festivals. Last year, we helped make a summer concert series in Connecticut a zero-waste success, and we’re at it again this year and this time in partnership with Grind2Energy®, a unit of Emerson. Together, we kicked off our first event of the season at last week’s Kentucky Derby Festival in downtown Louisville, an event that draws nearly 1.5 million people each year. In the Chow Wagon area, the festival’s food court, we set up our very own “chow wagon”—Grind2Energy’s mobile food grinding unit—and showed event-goers how it can keep discarded food from going to waste. On average, event attendees produce around 1.5 pounds of waste per day, about a third of which is food waste. While recycling has become increasingly common at events and venues, food waste is usually intermingled with landfill trash, where it goes to waste and produces harmful methane gases. But if captured and appropriately processed, these negative effects can not only be avoided, but the discarded food can be recycled to create two valuable products: nutrient-dense compost and renewable electricity or transportation fuel! With the help of the Grind2Energy team and an incredible team of zero-waste volunteers from the University of Louisville Eco-Reps...

Bonnaroo Launches Refill Revolution

The use of alternative bottles and visits to filling stations and reduction in waste will be tracked so the Refill Revolution program can be tweaked next year. The goal is to significantly reduce festival waste over time. Bonnaroo’s sustainability team announced Tuesday the launch of Refill Revolution, a festival-wide pilot sustainability project designed to keep fans hydrated while encouraging them to rethink plastic consumption habits and reduce disposable cup and bottle waste at the event and beyond. Bonnaroo is teaming up with Steelys Drinkware and the Plastic Pollution Coalition to encourage fans to join the Refill Revolution by switching from conventional single-use plastic and compostable cups and bottles to reusable ones made of food-grade stainless steel. Festival goers will have access to more than 20,000 Bonnaroo-themed stainless steel water bottles and beverage cups that can be reused endlessly. Fans will be able to hydrate with their Bonnaroo drinkware at free water wells and free filtered drinking water stations positioned throughout the festival site as well as participating beverage service venues. “This project is a huge step toward furthering our goal to become as sustainable as possible as a festival,” said Laura Sohn, Bonnaroo’s sustainability coordinator. “It empowers and encourages fans to take steps to be part of the festival waste solution.” “We’re excited to help Bonnaroo ignite the Refill Revolution and showcase creative new ways for individuals and events to approach waste diversion,” said John Borg, founder and CEO of Steelys. “Bonnaroo has extraordinary relevance to thousands of music fans and presents a tremendous opportunity to rethink the disposable mentality that’s engrained in our culture.” “Consumption of disposable plastic...

This Is What Happens To Your Event Waste

These days, many planners ask venues to provide a recycling program for their event. But what happens to your event waste when it leaves the building? Every year, the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) finds out by integrating an offsite waste management tour into their pre-event General Assembly site visit. Why do they do it? What do they learn and how can you plan your own? What is an offsite waste management tour? This activity takes event planning team members to visit the facilities that receive left-over event materials. It takes 2-3 hours and typically includes a stop at a recycling plant (or perhaps more than one), and a composting facility. UUA’s tour takes place eight months before their event and includes UUA staff, MeetGreen, venue, catering and convention and visitor bureau employees, and interested UUA event committee members. Watch this video to learn more about Rhode Island recovery facility – where UUA’s event materials will be recycled. Marcel Lussier of the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Center explains to the UUA General Assembly event team what is happening on the floor of the recycling plant Find out more over at Shawna McKinley’s great blog: eventcellany.com/2014/06/08/uua-ga-providence-waste/...

Marriott To Help Event Planners Go Paperless

It’s a no-brainer solution to eliminate paper waste. Most hotel companies these days have people who spearhead their sustainability efforts. At Marriott International, one of those people is Andrew Moffett whose all-encompassing title (Global Discipline Leader, Event Management) doesn’t reflect all the “green” pies he has his hands in: helping to develop Marriott’s green-meetings philosophy; developing programs with partners and vendors to provide greener solutions; coming up with ways technology can further the sustainability efforts, both internal and external, and more. Here’s a chat with the 19-year Marriott veteran. “Which Marriott initiative are you most proud of?” Our technology efforts. Technology has shifted how we as business owners and meeting attendees work with the hotel. About a year ago, we launched the Meetings Services App, a web-based app, at our North American properties. The planner receives a dedicated URL three days before their event, giving them one person on property with direct access to that meeting planner at the hotel. The app really is a request center for the meeting planner, to request more coffee, add more chairs, etc. We are launching it globally currently; started to deploy in Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Europe, and giving JW and Renaissance hotels their own branded solutions. We feel we have an opportunity to build more into the app now, such as bill review, and we are looking at adding documentation like group-room pickup. We want to build more paperless solutions in. All of these requests sent through by the meeting planner, we’ll keep in the database for 120 days after the event. So if the planner has a question about...

Glastonbury Festival Declares War On Plastic Water Bottles

Next weekend’s Glastonbury festival is to combat the scourge of the plastic water bottle as part of a long-term strategy to become the world’s most environmentally friendly outdoor musical event. Festival organisers are targeting the disposable bottle – one of the most conspicuous symbols of the throwaway culture that each year leaves the 900-acre Somerset site wreathed in plastic, with an estimated one million plastic bottles being used during the festival. Stainless-steel reusable bottles will be given to 2,000 road crew and band members, with thousands more on sale to festival-goers to stop them relying on plastic bottles. The 140,000 ticket-holders are also being urged to bring reusable bottles that they can fill at 400 drinking water taps dotted across the site. Lucy Smith, Glastonbury’s green issues organiser, said: “We have amazing water quality in the UK but everyone is obsessed with drinking bottled water.” She said the initiative precedes a plan for Glastonbury 2015 to replace all plastic pint pots and cutlery with reusable items in an attempt to eradicate the legacy of plastic waste from the huge rural site. Environmentalists estimate that 150 million tonnes of plastic waste currently litters the planet and oceans, poisoning ecosystems and killing wildlife. Ultimately, festival organisers hope to make Glastonbury the world’s greenest greenfield festival, emulating America’s Burning Man festival in the Black Rock desert of Nevada, which is a “leave no trace” event where people have to take away all that they bring. This post was produced from this story:...

2014 World Cup In Brazil To Go “Green”

The Brazilian government promised that the 2014 football World Cup would be an ecological event. Music festivals and other large gatherings now claim to pursue the same goal. But how far can the organisers really go in making their events green? “We want to score green goals,” Brazil’s Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira announced at a press conference on 28 May. Hosting a major sports event such as the football World Cup is in fact a huge challenge in terms of environmental consequences. Building stadiums and infrastructures, flying in the teams, the personnel and the public, hosting them, handling their waste, etc., all comes at a cost – and that cost is easily translatable into greenhouse gases emissions. Ms. Texeira said that the 2014 World Cup was expected to directly emit 59,000 metric tons of carbon – the figure rises to 1.4 billion metric tons when indirect emissions are taken into account. That is half the footprint of the 2012 London Olympics. At times of economic and ecological crises, events such as the World Cup or the Olympics arouse criticism from local populations and foreign observers for being too expensive, or environmentally harmful – and often both. Brazil has seen strong protests in the past weeks and months, and is facing the tricky equation that every organiser of such events now has to deal with: how to reconcile the entertainment the public is expecting with the needs of local populations and environmental issues. In other words, how can it be made a win-win event for everyone? Together with the United Nations Environment Programme, the government also launched the ““green passport””:...
San Francisco Bans Water Bottles at Public Events

San Francisco Bans Water Bottles at Public Events

San Francisco has a plan to eliminate incinerators and landfill by 2020, and to attain this goal, one of the latest moves is to ban the sale or distribution of small plastic bottles of water on public property – which means events! The city  authorities plan to install drinking fountains. Compostable cups will be handed out at large gatherings. “There are incredible, enormous environmental costs of plastic water bottles. It takes 1,000 years for a typical plastic water bottle to biodegrade,” said David Chiu, president of the board of supervisors, who introduced the measure. “If we can do this on public property and folks understand this is absolutely doable, then we can look at next steps.” In other words, consider an overall ban. San Francisco has adopted this step-by-step method since the Zero Waste scheme was decided in 2002. “California had already set a target for 50% recycling [of solid waste] by 2010. But we wanted to go further,” says Jared Blumenfeld, former head of San Francisco’s department of the environment and now Environmental Protection Agency regional administrator for the Pacific south-west. “We agreed on an ambitious zero-waste target and then on a date, which was far enough away for us to find the means of achieving it, but close enough for everyone to feel immediately concerned.” The target was set for 2020, with a 75% step on the way in 2010. “We don’t see waste as a burden, rather as a resource which can be used,” says Robert Reed, head of public relations at Recology, the employee-owned company that collects and processes San Francisco’s waste. This post was...
Happiness Recycled by Coca Cola at UK Music Festivals

Happiness Recycled by Coca Cola at UK Music Festivals

Coca-Cola Enterprises has re-launched its summer festivals recycling initiative, Happiness Recycled, which features an assortment of interactive bins, games and performers. The company explained that the re-launch is part of its drive to encourage sustainable behaviour change in consumers and boost recycling rates across Great Britain. This year, CCE said that it will have a presence at two summer festivals; the Royal Highland Show in Scotland, from 19th to 22nd June, and British Summer Time in London’s Hyde Park on the 12th and 13th July. Designed to make the recycling process fun, the bins engage visitors through a number of interactive activities, including: A new table football game. To activate the game bottles must be recycled to release the ball A Batak performance challenge, where consumers react to light sensors to recycle as much as they can in 30 seconds. The return of last year’s basketball shooting challenge A giant interactive flower pot recycling bin   Participants will be congratulated on their recycling success by ‘flash mob’ CCE performers, and can collect memento photos to take home or share online via social media. More info on British Summer Time’s Sustainability Initiatives. This post was produced from this story:...
Des Moines Arts Festival Zero Waste by 2016

Des Moines Arts Festival Zero Waste by 2016

Des Moines Arts Festival has created a comprehensive, long-range Sustainability Vision designed to identify and implement strategies and procedures that will dramatically reduce waste during the 2014 event. One of the main objectives in this plan is to achieve a zero-waste Festival by 2016. This plan is designed to support and encourage best practices that ensure the Des Moines Arts Festival has a minimal negative impact on the environment while still delivering a world-class event. A Sustainability Team will be on the ground dedicated to ensuring the goals of the Vision are not compromised. Examples of this are as follows: Vinyl banners used during the Festival are recycled and made into tote bags and other uses rather than deposited in the landfill. Free bike valet service provided by Friends of Central Iowa Trails encourages guests to cycle to the Festival instead of driving. All generators used to power the Festival site run on a biodiesel blend. Any paper correspondence is printed on recycled paper and postconsumer waste materials. Food vendors will be required to use compostable plates, utensils, napkins, and containers. Artists and volunteers are provided designated water stations to fill reusable bottles, eliminating thousands of disposable plastic bottles. Information provided to all participating vendors is delivered electronically and posted on the Festival’s web site in order to eliminate paper and other non-recyclable products. Other merchandise options are non-woven bags that can be reused by guests as tote bags, and reusable water bottles. Beverages will be sold in recyclable plastic bottles and aluminum. The application process for the juried art fair is completely paperless, using an online registration, application, jury and communications...
Taking the ‘Tent Commandments’ at Isle of Wight Festival

Taking the ‘Tent Commandments’ at Isle of Wight Festival

The RESPECT camping field is up and running for the third year at the Isle of Wight Festival. Festival goers can gain access to this beautiful field with it’s unique vibe by signing up on the festival’s website, and agreeing to take their voluntary terms and conditions, known as the Tent Commandments! In this campers promise to abide by the code of conduct and take their tent and all their belongings away with them after the festival. It’s been spectacular the last two years with only 18 tents left in 2011 and then 3 tents left last year from over a thousand people camping there for four days. The Tent Commandments Thou shalt Love Your Tent. Thou shalt not buy cheap, one-use tents, but invest in one that will last for years to come. Thou shalt never leave your tent anywhere for someone else to dismantle and take to landfill (recycling facilities for all tent components currently don’t exist) Thou shalt RESPECT your tent and the area in which you pitch it, making sure you clean up after yourself……even during and after a weekend of partying at the Festival. Thou shalt spread the word and encourage others to Love Their Tent Thou shalt clearly demonstrate your devotion to your tent and send evidence to iloveit@loveyourtent.com (Keep it clean people!) Thou shalt love thy neighbour and not disturb them by playing bongos at 4am. Thou shalt follow all additional on-site guidelines in order to keep the respect for others and the environment. Thou shalt join our community www.facebook.com/LoveYourTent and keep up to date on news from Festival land as well as the chance to enter...
Reducing Food Waste at Events

Reducing Food Waste at Events

Food waste is the unfortunate by-product of many events. It occurs through the mishandling of food, through over-supply and under-eating. Food waste at events is waste of resources, of time and effort, and of course, of money. It costs to buy the ingredients, pay the staff and then to dispose of the waste. Food into landfill is a major cause of landfill methane emissions, a global greenhouse gas emissions contributor.  Food waste at events also contributes to startling global  food waste statistics, estimated at 1/3 of all food produced being lost or wasted.[i] The Love Food Hate Waste campaign in the UK aims to do just that – to raise awareness of the need to reduce food waste and help people take action. www.lovefoodhatewaste.com Here’s a quick checklist of actions you can take to avoid or reduce food waste at your event: Food service: [list type=”check”] Serve less food. At conferences do people really want to be stuffed full?! Avoid over catering. Accurately estimate the volume of food required considering the number of attendees, the event type and timing of activities or breaks. Accurately brief caterers & food stalls: Communicate honestly the likely event attendance to caterers and food vendors. Don’t overbook: Ensure you don’t book too many food stallholders considering the likely event attendance. Attendee uptake: Understand if attendees may bring their own food and adjust communications and logistics accordingly. Ensure an even spread of types of food options that are likely to appeal to your attendees, so that no individual food stallholders are less attended that others, leading to food waste. Pricing: Ensure pricing of food does not lead to lower sales volumes than anticipated. Communicate: Inform attendees what...

Sunrise Festival Extreme Source Separation

Much of the issue concerning responsible waste processing at large festivals stems not from attendees’ reluctance to recycle or compost but rather from the challenge of designing systems that take into consideration the mental state of those in attendance. As the organisers at Sunrise Festival (Somerset, UK) found, best intentions can be subverted when audience members are, for instance, in a rush to get somewhere within the event site, or under the influence of alcohol or other substances, or even just agog at the surrounding spectacle! Despite strong credentials – being completely powered by renewables, having an ethical trading policy, promoting public and shared transport, having composting toilets, issuing reusable water bottles – and through this attracting attendees sensitive to their cause, organisers were disheartened to find that only 30% of waste was being removed for recycling through successful segregation by attendees. In light of this, organisers teamed up with Greensweep to develop a highly segmented and visible system of waste separation and collection. The system segregrated recyclable and compostable material into more than a dozen categories (eg. glass, milk bottles, nappies, cornstarch cutlery, cardboard, hazardous, etc.) each with their own bin. To prevent the waylaid punter from depositing into the wrong bin volunteers were used at each bin point to guide them to the correct repository. Additionally, when volunteers clocked on at the beginning of every day they would check the bins for contamination and re-sort appropriately. This was done in plain view of waking campers, imparting upon them the effort exerted in corrective sorting. Contamination decreased from one day to the next as a result. Upcycle workshops...