It’s Waterless Toilet At Latitude Festival

Journalist-turned-innovator Virginia Gardiner has received backing from the Gates Foundation for Loowatt – an invention that generates power from the waste we produce. Gardiner says the technology can be used in disaster relief situations and areas where toilet facilities are a problem. Given the nature of her quest, it is just as well that Virginia Gardiner has never been too self-conscious about bodily functions and their taboos. In her mission to create a waterless loo that uses no energy and turns the waste into a useable product, Gardiner has exhibited a bowl moulded from horse manure and monitored the activity of composting worms in her bathroom, turning “poop” into fertile soil, she said. Now, seven years after she embarked on her plan to revolutionise the “most un-innovative part of anybody’s house”, her Loowatt waterless toilet will be shown off to festival goers at Latitude in Suffolk this month It is the latest move in a project which has raised some £2m in funding along the way including cash from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The key to the Loowatt system is a biodegradable lining that runs around the bowl. When the “flush” is triggered, the waste is pushed down into a cartridge beneath which, later emptied into a digester, provides the raw material that is broken down by microorganisms into biogas and fertiliser. This post was produced from this story :...

Ski Resorts Can Go Green Too!

Powdr Corp, which owns Park City Mountain Resort in Utah and eight other ski areas, has reduced its carbon footprint about 60 percent in seven years, reports The Aspen Times. The company has invested about $6 million in sustainability initiatives, which include energy-efficient snowmakers, renewable-wind-energy credits, LED lighting, biofuel snowcats and a gondola powered by methane gas from cow manure. “Park City Mountain Resort has been one of Utah’s leading ski resorts on overall sustainability and putting their money where their mouth is,” Sara Baldwin Auck, senior policy and regulatory associate at the nonprofit Utah Clean Energy, tells the newspaper. Powd has implemented similar sustainability programs at its other resorts, including Copper Mountain in Colorado, Vermont’s Killington, Mt. Bachelor in Oregon and Boreal Mountain near Lake Tahoe, Calif. Park City and Vail Mountain are among the 108 US ski areas that have joined Ceres and its BICEP (Business for Innovative Climate and Energy Policy) coalition in signing the Climate Declaration, which calls upon federal policymakers to address climate change as an economic opportunity. The winter tourism industry in the US experienced an estimated $1 billion loss and up to 27,000 fewer jobs from 1999 to 2010 because of diminished snowfall patterns, according to a December 2012 study prepared for the Natural Resources Defense Council and nonprofit group Protect Our Winters. This post was produced from this story :...

Busch Stadium Reduces Energy Consumption by 20%

Thanks to the implementation of different energy-efficiency measures – Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Mo., has cut its energy use by 20 percent. The measures are part of the 4 A Greener Game program, which the St. Louis Cardinals began during the 2008 season, according to BND.com. The Cardinals are also participating in the Act On Energy program. Operated by St. Louis-based utility company Ameren, the program provides energy-savings guidance to its residential, business and industrial customers. Most of the stadium lighting and all of the lighting at Ballpark Village were replaced with CFLs, and occupancy sensors were installed in several rooms at the stadium so that lights turn off automatically when no one is present. Additional measures included replacing refrigeration equipment and pumps and blowers in the HVAC system with more energy-efficient models and installing solar panels. As a result of these energy-savings efforts, the Cardinals have cut their electric bill by nearly $300,000 annually. In October 2013, the National Resources Defense Council ranked Busch Stadium 5th on its Top 10 Energy Efficient Stadiums list. The Cardinals are looking for more opportunities to implement energy-savings measures in the future. This post was produced from this story :...

Learn How The Longfellow Clubs Achieve Sustainability Milestones

A Boston-group of sports clubs, known as The Longfellow Clubs, has released details of some of its sustainability measures, showing that it has saved well over a million gallons of water since implementing them in 2006. As part of these efforts, the clubs have done the following: Replaced all urinals with waterless urinals that save over 45,000 gallons of water per urinal, per year. Replaced all 3.5-4 gallon per minute showerheads with 2 gallon per minute showerheads, resulting in a savings of several hundred thousand gallons of water per year. Decreased water use in the Longfellow Wayland location from an average of 255,923 gallons of water per month in 2006 to 160,500 average gallons of water per month in 2013. The clubs have also made significant cuts in their energy usage, including: Replaced 1,000 watt metal halide lights on the tennis courts with 500-700 watt induction fluorescent bulbs, increasing quality and brightness while reducing wattage by 40 percent. The change is expected to reduce energy usage by 55 percent. Decreased electricity usage in the Longfellow Natick location from 501,920 kilowatt hours in 2007 to 361,840 KWH. According to the clubs, energy savings have been significant, with some energy savings as high as 64 percent for locations that began changes in 2006-2007. In March 2013, the Natick Racquet Club, on behalf of the Longfellow Clubs, joined 1% for the Planet, the world’s largest environmental network. The club joined in order to further reduce its environmental impact and connect with like-minded businesses. Through the company’s involvement in the network, the Natick Racquet Club seeks the expertise of the Sustainable Business Network...

San Francisco 49ers to Use 85% Recycled Water in their Levi’s Stadium Home

Recycled water will account for roughly 85 percent of all water used in Levi’s Stadium — the new home of the San Francisco 49ers — and will be used for irrigation of the field as well as a 27,000-square-foot green roof, flushing toilets and cooling tower make-up water. Inside, the stadium is dual plumbed with recycled water used for flushing toilets. Following final testing by the City of Santa Clara Water and Sewer Utilities, Levi’s Stadium recently was connected to the city’s recycled water system, making it the first stadium in California to utilize the drought-proof water source. The milestone brings the facility one step closer to a Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification. Though other stadiums in the U.S. are plumbed for recycled water use, none are using it to the extent and in the myriad ways as is Levi’s Stadium. “Utilizing recycled water in so many different spaces and in such a variety of ways was a challenging proposition,” said Chris de Groot, the City’s Director of Water and Sewer Utilities. “We had to develop a new way to test both potable and recycled systems for a building of this size, and get approval from the California Department of Public Health. Through innovation and cooperative partnerships, we were able to achieve this new standard.” The recycled water system will be a key element in helping to make Levi’s Stadium one of the most sustainable stadiums in the country and the first NFL stadium to open with a LEED Gold rating from the US Green Building Council. Other sustainable features include energy efficient systems, solar...

How We Love Green Festival Keeps Sustainable Infrastructure

Three years in, We Love Green (WLG) still attracts visitors from all over Europe who are intrigued to see how the festival’s premises develop. It seems difficult to imagine a festival that generates zero harmful waste, and it might be even harder to believe that this more sustainable infrastructure actually works. But so far We Love Green has been hugely successful, and has even been nominated as Europe’s best small festival. How exactly do they do it? Creating magic in the pastoral setting of Paris’ Parc de Bagatelle is We Love Green, a 2 day event set to enrich its attendees through creative encounters and artistic discovery. We Love Green (WLG) is all about creating awareness and respect for our environment. Last week one of Paris’ botanical gardens experienced Europe’s most environmentally friendly music festival. Musicians such as Foals, Lorde, Cat Power, Little Dragon, and numerous DJs played some sets, but here the artists are not really the main attraction. Growing Sustainable Infrastructure WLG is very serious about the impact it has upon the environment. Anyone who has been to a public festival can testify to the amount of garbage and waste these types of event usually generate. The terrain used is often destroyed and littered with detritus, which is what WLG tries really hard to avoid. To begin with, the festival (stage included) is powered entirely by solar and wind power. Recycle bins are peppered throughout the site, and all the waste generated is sorted and later composted, even the cutlery. The installations are provided by neighboring art students, and are 100% reusable. All the food from the...

Marriott To Help Event Planners Go Paperless

It’s a no-brainer solution to eliminate paper waste. Most hotel companies these days have people who spearhead their sustainability efforts. At Marriott International, one of those people is Andrew Moffett whose all-encompassing title (Global Discipline Leader, Event Management) doesn’t reflect all the “green” pies he has his hands in: helping to develop Marriott’s green-meetings philosophy; developing programs with partners and vendors to provide greener solutions; coming up with ways technology can further the sustainability efforts, both internal and external, and more. Here’s a chat with the 19-year Marriott veteran. “Which Marriott initiative are you most proud of?” Our technology efforts. Technology has shifted how we as business owners and meeting attendees work with the hotel. About a year ago, we launched the Meetings Services App, a web-based app, at our North American properties. The planner receives a dedicated URL three days before their event, giving them one person on property with direct access to that meeting planner at the hotel. The app really is a request center for the meeting planner, to request more coffee, add more chairs, etc. We are launching it globally currently; started to deploy in Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Europe, and giving JW and Renaissance hotels their own branded solutions. We feel we have an opportunity to build more into the app now, such as bill review, and we are looking at adding documentation like group-room pickup. We want to build more paperless solutions in. All of these requests sent through by the meeting planner, we’ll keep in the database for 120 days after the event. So if the planner has a question about...

Water Savings Meredith Music Festival

Meredith Music Festival and Golden Plains are two annual events held on the same site in rural, in semi-cleared bushland, 90km West of Melbourne, in Victoria, Australia in December and March. The venue is a spectacular, permanent site, set up specifically for both events, owned and managed by the festival producers. It has been purpose-built and continually-refined using 18 years of collective know-how to provide a premium experience for performer and patron alike. The festivals both run over two days, with most patrons camping. Meredith has an audience of 10 000 and Golden Plains 8 000. There are many sustainable initiatives at the festivals such as onsite composting of waste, energy efficient lighting and retrofitting underway, and onsite solar powered kitchen with rain water capture for staff. The focus of this case study however is: Permanent composting toilets Harvested water sustainable shower blocks The Problem Toilets and showers have long been the bane of the festivalgoer’s generally happy existence. In order to address this and the many operational issues associated with water-based toilets and showers, Meredith management decided to build their own onsite permanent infrastructure that is far superior to standard hire-in options. This has worked to improve the comfort and overall experience for festival-goers and makes the festival itself easier, cheaper (in the long run) and more enjoyable to operate for management and staff. Also of consideration is the fact that the Meredith site is in an agricultural and farming area of regional/rural Victoria that gets very little rain. The region, like many others in Victoria, is feeling the effects of the ongoing drought and is on stage...

Festival Showers

Falls Festival treats 100% of the 250 000 litres of wastewater created onsite through the forty onsite showers and wastewater points through a soak-away trenches. Soak-away drainage trenches are located at each of the shower blocks with 50% of water treated by soakage. Any excess that cannot be handled by the localised soak-aways is placed in a large centralized soak-away trench. If it’s particularly dry and there isn’t much moisture content in the earth, the soak-away system works significantly quicker. At the end of the event there is usually about 100 000 litres left to treat which is done managed throughout the year through the soak-away trenches....

Bottle Deposit – Roskilde Festival

At Roskilde Festival in Denmark, they have the benefit of the Danish refillable bottle deposit scheme. As a result they run a highly successful recycling programme where the majority of bottles and cans are returned and refunds given out. However, as attendees travel from across Europe to the event, and can bring any food and drinks they want into the campsites, the festival ends up with many bottles and cans onsite that were sourced from outside of the Danish refund scheme. Roskilde honours a refund for any bottle or can, whether it was part of the original countrywide deposit system or not. They fund these extra refunds, but also ensure that the cans, plastic and glass bottles are kept separate and then sell them to recyclers to help recoup some of the costs. All drinks sold inside the arena come in cups and a one Danish Krone deposit charged, which is refunded when the cups are returned. ...

Onsite Composting

Woodford Folk Festival in Queensland Australia is held on land owned by the Queensland Folk Federation, who also run the event. It has continuing sustainable development of the land as an underlying feature of the event and site operations and compositing its biodegradable waste is part of this. Organic waste is collected from the Festival Village and camping areas in 120 litre bins and transported to the onsite processing location. An effort is made to manually remove non-organic contaminants from the collected waste. The level of this contamination is the weakest point in the process. The site that the composting takes place on is graded hardstand, and has its own leachate dam. This is where rainwater run-off goes. The dam is mechanically drained to onsite ‘black water’. The raw festival waste is blended with a carbon rich waste stream and placed in a windrow on the hardstand. The windrow dimensions are governed by the composition of the two waste streams. Post festival the heap is covered with waste hessian to deter animal interference and aid moisture retention. The heap is left to the elements and natural life forms to break it down to compost that will be less than 10% the volume of the original material. After stick picking the remnants of biodegradable cutlery and shredding them for mulch or discarding them, this product is used on the festival grounds and some used to activate the fresh waste collected at the next Festival....

Vancouver 2012 PVC Recycling

Many events, especially mega-events like the Olympic Games, take over venues and need to re-brand these venues. Often this is called ‘overlay’ when it comes to signage and branding. They need to be wrapped, signed, and rebranded often with huge vinyl stickers. At the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, approximately 200 000 square feet of vinyl graphics were used on Olympic buildings such as the Richmond Olympic Oval and the Pacific Coliseum, outdoor venue grandstands, 4 600 vehicles, 500 buses, and eight resurfacing machines. 3M Canada was the official supplier of building and vehicle vinyl wraps for the 2010 Olympic Winter Games, and they were charged with the task, by organisers of ensuring all vinyl materials they supplied, would be re-used. With assistance from the Vinyl Council of Canada, they partnered with Mannington Commercial, a vinyl flooring company with a long track record of vinyl recycling projects. This great industry collaboration, resulted in all of 3M’s vinyl graphic material from the 2010 Olympics being diverted from landfill and remanufactured into Mannington high recycled content flooring.  ...

Every Can Counts

Every Can Counts teamed up with Festival Republic to give three students the chance to be a Student Recycling Champion at Reading Festival. Student Recycling Champions worked with Every Can Counts to help promote drinks can recycling and had the chance to see behind the scenes of a major music event. Competition entrants had to impress organisers with a bright idea to encourage more festival-goers to do the right thing with their empty drink cans. Ideas that came in included creating artworks on site from recycled cans, producing stickers to promote the Reading Festival ‘your can counts’ incentive (where bags of empty cans can be exchanged for a free drink token) and offering recyclers the opportunity to fast track the queues for the artists’ signing tent. The project offered the students an opportunity to learn about, and contribute towards, a sustainability issue on the national agenda, experience developing and implementing real life solutions to increase recycling outside the home, and the opportunity to create contacts within the packaging, waste management and sustainability industries....

Virtual Conferencing

On television they’re the evil Visitors. In the graphic novel and film he’s scorned as a terrorist. For meetings the letter ‘V’ might assume the same degree of loathing and dread: the Virtual Meeting! Striking fear in the hearts of many an event professional, the virtual meeting is something we can’t deny but at the same time can’t find it possible to fully embrace given how counter it is to the destination-driven business model for meetings. Yet for event sustainability, the model presents significant benefits, as proven by a recent analysis of a hybrid meeting. The Event: An invitation-only business meeting, hosting attendees from around the world. 1 600 executive attendees attending in person, 5 700 technical specialists attending virtually. The Scope: Carbon footprint analysis completed for the in-person meeting, including venue, hotels, ground transport and air travel. Additional analysis of the virtual meeting, including estimated electricity used while in the virtual environment. The Result: An estimated 2 355 metric tons of carbon emissions were produced by the in-person meeting for 1 600 participants. The 5 700-person virtual event produced an estimated 5.6 metric tons for carbon dioxide. 10 054 metric tons of emissions were avoided by inviting technical experts to participate virtually: the equivalent of taking 2 000 cars off the road for a year. The reality-check: Would all of the virtual attendees have attended in person if afforded the opportunity? Likely not. However the question remains: as a specific audience whose event participation needs are fulfilled by attending virtually should they attend in person? In the case of this event it would seem the traditional model of...

Run a Resource Reclamation Station

Make a bit of a fuss over your waste stations. Rather than have just a boring set of bins, think about creative ways to present your waste. This can include staffed booths, offering incentives to return waste, or making the bins art themselves. Global Inheritance has a waste bin art program. Look at their stuff here. www.globalinheritance.org/trashed-art-of-recycling    ...

Do you have Paperless Registration?

Challenge the team to produce a paperless event.  No business cards being collected on exhibition stands – use lanyard scanners or iPad/computer signups. Provide programs as smart phone apps. Do all registration electronically. Don’t allow promotional pamphlet handouts. Go to completely electronic ticketing. Tickets are purchased online, credit cards swiped or photo ID viewed at event entry/registration. Printed ticket step is missed and go straight to wristband or lanyard....