Powerline Starts To Carbon Offset Business And Power Usage At Events

The Powerline has launched an initiative that will see it carbon offset power usage at its clients’ events. ACP Productions was the first to be awarded a carbon offset certificate in Gateshead last week for its work on the three-day CBBC Live event. The Powerline worked with ACP Productions and the BBC and provided a twin-set generator to power the main stage and outside broadcast units and a small road tow generator for non-broadcast elements. Ben Ousby, project leader at The Powerline, presented Scott “Scottie” McKean, project director at ACP Productions, with the certificate confirming that the event’s power has been offset through an internationally recognised scheme, ISO 4001. This move is one of the first steps of a three-year mission, which will see Powerline become a carbon neutral company by 2016. In year one, it has committed to offset all carbon emissions created from the burning of all diesel purchased, which will account for 95 per cent of its projects and all Powerline vehicles. In 2015, it plans to offset all emissions from all generator usage. So not only will Powerline offset its own fuel but also that of fuel supplied by clients. In 2016, Powerline plans to offset all carbon emissions generated by any aspect of the day to day running of the business, including the commuting of all Powerline staff. Jim Creed, managing director of The Powerline, said: “My reluctance on the grounds of compromising integrity to follow the eco trail has led to my team finding a genuine, realistic and viable answer to the green question. We have been seeking a wide range of sustainable...

Looking for an Offset Project? Compost

In a great alignment between a company and an offsetting project, Kuoni, luxury travel company, is fully funding a compost programme in Ubud, Bali. The Gianyar Waste Recovery carbon offset project on Bali composts organic waste that previously had to be dumped. In this way, methane emissions from the tip can be avoided and high-value compost is being produced. Bali, the most important tourism destination in Indonesia, has a growing waste problem which is already having an impact on the tourism sector. In the so far untouched landscape, waste is being illegally disposed of in rivers and lakes, canals, and along the streets. The small amount of gathered waste from the project region Gianyar, in the southeast of the island, is disposed of on a tip in the vicinity of the village Temesi. The methane developing from such a tip is neither collected nor burned and therefore rises unhindered into the atmosphere. In the face of the deterioration of the situation onsite, the Rotary Club of Bali Ubud decided to counteract this problem and planned and implemented a composting plant. 85% of waste in the region is from organic material, which can be composted. Another 5%, mainly plastics, can be recycled so that after the implementation of the project only 10% is dumped on the tip. Since aerobic composting does not cause methane emissions, a considerable reduction of GHGs can be achieved. The local population also benefits, in that the air pollution from the tip is reduced, the waste volume is reduced by around 90%, and jobs are created....