View Envision Festival Costa Rica eco-initiatives in this short video

Envision Festival In Costa Rica is creating a new, sustainable model for festivals and for a culture of awareness through permaculture initiatives and education. Envision is a Leave No Trace event, and we therefore always leave the land in as good if not better condition than we found it. We try to minimize waste sent to the landfills and maximize recycling and composting rates, conserve water as much as possible, mitigate our atmospheric impact from transportation and energy, source only environmentally-sound products and materials, and we always maintain positive relations with our surrounding community. Read more of their eco initiatives here: http://www.2015.envisionfestival.com/index.php/env-event-info/eco-initiatives-sustainability-report Source:...

California music festivals adopt green mindset

Three of the big musical events taking place in the Golden State are recognized for and take extra effort to be as sustainable as possible. It is no longer breaking news that California is in the midst of a severe drought, so this summer it may be in the best interest of the Golden State to stay away from the waterslides and to drain those swimming pools. With music festival season kicking off, pools won’t be the only thing that students will be draining. Student bank accounts quickly empty as each festival approaches. Although the prices may be steep, several music festivals are making innovative efforts to use ticket costs to create more sustainable events. Students can spare water, contribute to a more sustainable community and see all their favorite bands this summer at any of these top three eco-friendly festivals in California. Source:...

Festivals leading the green revolution in Bristol, UK

There’s no escaping the important role Bristol is playing in the battle against climate change as the 2015 Green Capital and with so many festivals taking place in the city, it follows suit that these two elements would tally up. With millions of people attending UK festivals every year, a significant amount of which take place in and around Bristol or are attended by festival-loving Bristolians (of which there are thousands) there is more pressure being put on the environment. Our festivals are collectively responsible for about 15 kilotonnes of carbon dioxide emissions each year. The main contributor of carbon emissions at festivals is usually travel, which accounts for an average of 60-80% of a festival’s carbon footprint. For a festival of 10,000 people, this is a massive 120 tonnes of carbon dioxide.  Thankfully a lot of the big players in the UK festival scene have cottoned onto the importance of this and are taking significant steps to address this. Source:...

A Greener Music Festival

Glastonbury festival is one of the biggest festivals in the world. During the course of the festival around 2,000 tonnes of rubbish are generated. So what happens to it? This year the Glastonbury organisers hope to recycle more that 50% of it, and have a small army of volunteers on the job. The festival came and passed in a flash, but the rubbish mountains generated at the festival over five days of music and mud calls for a massive clean-up operation. Read more:...

BALÉLEC FESTIVAL: The First SWISS Event 20121 ISO Certified!

Seven years after the first Swiss Festival to certify its environmental management system ISO 14001: 2004, the organizing committee is pleased to announce that it was awarded by the certification body ProCert 20121 ISO: 2012 for its new management system integrating the principles of sustainable development. This dual certification is an exemplary approach and the organizing committee hopes that it will be recognized and followed by other events in Switzerland. Do not hesitate to contact us at iso@balelec.ch for more information. A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE STANDARD This management standard published in 2012 is specially dedicated to events of all types and sizes in which the organization is committed to establish, implement, maintain and improve a system of responsible management integrating the principles of sustainable development. Standard and provides a framework for identifying impacts, both social, economic and environmental potential negative activities, to remove or mitigate, and take advantage of more positive impact through improved planning and process. WHY INTEGRATE SUCH AN APPROACH? Since 2007, the organization has built an environmental management system certified ISO 14’001 and identified areas for improvement in terms of its impact on the environment. The organization wanted to expand its system in order to have a more comprehensive view of its impact and strengthen dialogue with its stakeholders . Better target the needs and expectations of its partners is crucial to maintain the success of the Festival in the long term. 20’121 ISO standard provides a framework ideally suited to the needs and priorities of each event and the full ISO 14’001 system already established by the organization. This post was produced from this...

Rethinking Trash, Trust and Eight Days

We’re getting there, but a waste free Roskilde Festival is still a long way to go. In the mist of an eight-day sensational ride, some of us still forget what happens, when you leave something behind. How do we improve waste mentality? Funny as it may seem, climbing out of your tent doesn’t have to be a challenge trying to avoid a nest of beer cans. The smell of a new morning doesn’t have to be an explosion of decay stepping on the can of fish you left two nights before. Roskilde Festival doesn’t have to be that way with a little help from you and your friends. Despite numerous successful actions last year we are still struggling to create a healthy trash mentality. This year Roskilde Festival once again tightens effort against the trash issue. Introducing clean areas, putting up more bins and developing trash points making it even easier and more effortless for participants to keep the camping areas clean. Ultimately it will be up to everyone to see these actions through – hopefully changing the way we handle our cans and food wrappings for good. But that’s not all you can do. Sowing the seed of the ‘Clean Areas’ Common sense might become distant in a mix of green grass, alcohol and music, but sometimes the happy settings yields a flood of great ideas from creative souls. That was the case last year, when one very resourceful guy collected petitions to remove the silent part of the ‘Silent & Clean’ area, where he was situated. He felt too restricted – and decided to do something about...

Shanghai Fashion Week

The 2011 Shanghai Fashion Week and after event party were explorations of the relationship between fashion, sustainability and the power of culture to influence ideas about new social concepts. It was produced as an event designed to promote the concept of ‘E-Fashion: Ethical, Eco, and Exceptional’. Beyond the fashion show, the organisers produced the event following recognised sustainability principles. Ultimately aiming to showcase what the future of runway shows should be. The vision was to create an example for fashion shows across the world by illuminating sustainability as a guiding light for Shanghai Fashion Week, the premier fashion event in the world’s fastest growing economy. Key sustainability issues were identified to be: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions resulting from delegate transport and local event operations Waste produced by stage and set production Lack of availability and high cost of sustainability food and beverage options Lack of efficient municipal recycling programme Low understanding of sustainability issues and product offering in the local event industry Supplier Code of Conduct: Inspired by the United Nations Global Compact, a Supplier Code of Conduct was prepared for the event. It outlined expectations for supplier compliance to ethical, responsible and sustainable business practices. All suppliers were asked to sign the code. Waste: Reducing waste to landfill was a focus. The carpets and curtains were collected for donation and sofa seating blocks and bar counters were salvaged for use by other events. Catering was addressed through finger food being served, and using washable crockery and glasses used instead of disposables. The venue did not have a formal recycling programme and so organisers worked with them to create...