Tollwood Festival

Since its very first festival in 1988, Tollwood Festival has embraced concern for environmental impacts into the event’s production. What began with the demonstration of a small solar cell has grown over the years into an essential and extremely effective part of the festival. In the early 90’s, Tollwood initiated an important innovation, contrary to accepted practice – that at festivals and similar events, food was only allowed to be served on disposables. Tollwood began serving food on porcelain, with a special dishwashing system set up by the organisers. It was this demonstration of what was possible, and a fantastic legacy to the industry in the region, which lead to the city of Munich requiring the Oktoberfest to serve food in reusable dishes too. Organic Catering From the beginning,Tollwood has also provided served food and drinks that are as ecologically as possible. Since 2003, their summer and winter Tollwood Festivals have been certified according to the EU Eco-Regulation.[i] Today, the dishes constist of close to 100% organic ingredients. Furthermore, each food vendor must provide at least one vegetarian main dish. In addition to the organic label, tea, coffee, wine, rice, sugar, chocolate, bananas and mangos carry a fair trade label. The project ‘Bio für Kinder’ (‘Organic for Children’) initiated at the beginning of 2006 together with the Department of Health and the Environment of the City of Munich has been one of Tollwood’s most successful campaigns. 31 sponsors from Munich’s business community helped to ensure that organic food is served at some 30 childcare institutions. As of today, close to 650 000 100% organic dishes have been served, with...

Green Footsteps Roskilde

Green Footsteps is Roskilde Festival’s environmental campaign that gives festival-goers the opportunity to choose a more eco-friendly life and festival style. The campaign encourages festival guests to act with consideration for the environment by taking Green Footsteps before, during and after the festival. The overall idea is that individual actions have great significance when taking care of the environment. The festival itself takes many green footsteps to take the event towards sustainability. This includes waste management, recycling and composting, container deposits for beer cups and energy management to source renewable energy options. And to encourage a greener footprint by their audience, the Green Footsteps programme has been implemented. It neatly communicates how the audience can be involved and Green Footsteps are found all over the festival site in which the audience can participate. In the initial years of the campaign Green Camps were set up for campers who had taken their own Green Footsteps (eg taking public transport to the event) and allowed them to register to have a spot in these renewable energy powered clean and green campsites. Now the programme has morphed and six Green Camps have been integrated throughout the entire campsite. Festival goers were invited to host a green camp – and invited to put in an application which explains how they will: Minimise the waste Have some fun green activities each day that involve and inspire other festival guests Have some kind of original or unusual theme and a catchy slogan that reflects ‘Green Footsteps’ green feet. Everyone should be able to see immediately that it is a Green Camp The green activities during...

Join the Love Your Tent campaign

Love Your Tent is a campaign in response to the vast amount of tents and rubbish left behind by people after attending events, and it was inspired by Eco Action Partnership’s work as Sustainability Consultants to the Isle of Wight Music Festival. The aim: Is to make the process of getting up and leaving everything behind you after an event has finished, in order for somebody else to have clear it all up, completely socially unacceptable. This campaign is about behaviour change and we want to encourage people to have more respect, both for their environment and definitely for themselves. www.loveyourtent.com So, what’s the problem? We work on a conservative estimate of 1 to 2 in every 6 tents being left behind, depending on the size of event, the audience demographic, and the all-important weather conditions. Add into this all of the other waste such as chairs, sleeping bags, marquees, pillows, cookers etc, and it means that there is a significant tonnage that is just simply collected and sent to landfill.  We acknowledge the great work that individual event producers are doing to salvage as much as possible from abandoned campsites. But there is only so much demand for second-hand camping equipment, and the salvage programs don’t do much to change attitudes to trashing tents. The Campaign: Our hope is that at every camping event people attend they will see the same actions, the same logo, the same coordinated support and the same message. We’ve made a short film and gathering support from festivals, social media sites, press and campers. We’re setting up an industry recognised standard, with both UK and EU government...

Run a Green Trader Award

Encourage food stalls, merchandise stalls, exhibitors and other vendors to be as sustainable as possible. This can be the products they are selling, the physical set up of their exhibit/stall, or the way they are operating. Put signage out to recognise the winners and offer them discounts or free pitches at future events. The trader in the image to the right was the ultimate! She harvested discarded tents from Reading Festival and made them into rain ponchos and bags to sell at Glastonbury...

Run a Resource Reclamation Station

Make a bit of a fuss over your waste stations. Rather than have just a boring set of bins, think about creative ways to present your waste. This can include staffed booths, offering incentives to return waste, or making the bins art themselves. Global Inheritance has a waste bin art program. Look at their stuff here. www.globalinheritance.org/trashed-art-of-recycling    ...

Green Energy Sign Up

Partner with a renewable energy provider. Get them to host a stall and challenge your attendees to sign their offices and homes up to a  green energy. The Bellingen Energy Festival is an event actually committed entirely to this concept! energyfestival.org...

Do Waste As Art

Collect recyclables and make art grow during your event. Use chicken wire and metal to create a frame and then fill it with cans. The photo on the right is at Sountbound Festival in Western Australia. You can also flatten the cans and stick them on the outside of the structure if you’re wanting to make a dragon or fish! This is what they did at Electric Picnic in Ireland. Use plastic milk bottles to make an elephant like that did at Glastonbury Festival in the...